Organizational Culture and its Effects on the Business

     Wednesday, February 6, 2019

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When it comes to organizational culture the size of the company does not matter, both small and large organizations have a set of rules and regulations known as the culture. Each corporate culture has their own set of rules and regulations that all employees follow.

Different Layers of the Organizational Culture

The different layers of organizational culture are visible from the diversity of the company, the career hierarchy, and the promotion and demotion rules. Culture is evident in the layout of their office, how the desks and cubicles are placed, and it lies in the communication channels used within the company. Each employee will see the cultural differences. Some might agree with the organizational culture while others might not be comfortable with the current organizational culture.

 

“Culture is simply a shared way of doing something with a passion.” – Brian Chesky, Co-Founder, CEO, Airbnb

 

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Symbols that Represent an Organizational Culture

Some of the basic elements of any organizational culture are the symbols, values, and rituals that exist within the company. As a business owner, you are responsible for maintaining a healthy organizational culture. The symbols you choose to represent your firm must be carefully laid out because it would serve as the main identity of the company.

 

Cultural symbols of a company primarily include the logo or emblem of the company. The building or the specific values of the company are considered as the symbols of the enterprise cultures. It is essential to envision corporate culture through special acronyms, business cards, emblems, logos, signs, colors, or things that have a special meaning for the organization.

“Over the years we learned that if we asked people to rely on logic and common sense instead of on formal policies, most of the time we would get better results, and at a lower cost.” – Patty McCord, Chief Talent Officer, Netflix

 

The Norms of Organizational Culture

The norms of organizational culture are known as the actions that you as a business owner will take when holding a meeting, the rewards and recognition systems, and organizational policies. For example, holding a meeting towards the end of a very productive week by the chief executive is an example of a cultural norm within a company.

 

Coffee breaks and lunch break duration depends on the organizational culture of a company. Some companies allow longer break hours for lunch but limited coffee breaks.

“Corporate culture is the only sustainable competitive advantage that is completely within the control of the entrepreneur.” – David Cummings, Co-Founder, Pardot

Organizational Values

Every company has some values that they adhere to and it eventually becomes an integral part of the internal culture of your organization. Values include ​​the various elements that determine how success within the company is achieved. Values ​​are expressed in the tendency of a group of people to choose certain things over others.

 

For example, considering the importance of paying attention to customers versus ensuring that all paperwork related to the sale is in the right order. Taking into account personal wishes and problems of employees versus emphasizing on being productive at work. Most successful organizations have a small number of values ​​and standards known as shared values, most employees within the company comply with these shared values.

 

“Determine what behaviors and beliefs you value as a company, and have everyone live true to them. These behaviors and beliefs should be so essential to your core that you don’t even think of it as a culture.” – Brittany Forsyth, VP of Human Relations, Shopify

In Summary

 

 
  • The norms of organizational culture are known as the actions that you as a business owner will take when holding a meeting, the rewards and recognition systems, and organizational policies.

  • Some of the basic elements of any organizational culture are the symbols, values, and rituals that exist within the company.

  • Cultural symbols of a company primarily include the logo or emblem of the company. The building or the specific values of the company are considered as the symbols of the enterprise cultures.

  • The different layers of organizational culture are visible from the diversity of the company, the career hierarchy, and the promotion and demotion rules.

  • When it comes to organizational culture the size of the company does not matter, both small and large organizations have a set of rules and regulations known as the culture.

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