5 Steps to Writing A Lead Generation Sales Page

Carol Brennan      Wednesday, February 1, 2017

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A Way With Words

So it’s time to your write your sales page. But to be honest, you don’t know where to start.

Navigating the rules about what goes where what to include and how to keep it from turning into a page that simply sends your readers to sleep rather than captivates them can be tough.

Writing your sales page doesn’t have to turn into a nightmare if you remember to include a few vital components:

• Start with the Pain

• Get Clear

• Handle Objections

• Prove Your Solution Works

• Close with a Strong CT

 

 

Many people make the mistake of starting their sales pages by talking about their product. Remember that your clients are seeking help for a pain they have in their lives.

You have to show them that you understand their pain to convince them that your product is the solution to that pain. For example, if you are a productivity coach, your clients might feel totally overwhelmed.

One of the symptoms of this overwhelm might be an ever-growing list of tasks that they never finish. They’ve tried writing to-do lists, but they never seem to get to the end of them.

They haven’t worked because the tasks they are setting are too big. You help them break down these tasks into small, manageable chunks.

 

 

They’ve tried writing to-do lists, but they never seem to get to the end of them. They haven’t worked because the tasks they are setting are too big. You help them break down these tasks into small, manageable chunks.

You might not want to define your ideal client because you want to appeal to everyone but a product that’s for everyone appeals to no one. It ends up being very bland.

Decide on who your best client is. Who would get the most out of your product? 

For example, my productivity coaching is ideal for working mothers who need shortcuts to productivity.

Common objections are over time, price and whether the product is suitable for them. You can even take several objections and answer them in a frequently asked questions section.

 

 

For example, our productivity coach might tackle the objection of price by pointing out that her clients will have more time to make more money when they implement the productivity strategies she teaches them. 

You have to provide evidence that your product can do what you say it can. Sprinkle testimonials that back-up what you say you can do throughout your copy.

End with a strong call-to-action to encourage your ideal client to buy. Give them a reason to opt-in now such as a deadline for when the doors close. Also, explain what happens next – for example, will they get instant access?

So your call-to-action might look like this: “To end the overwhelm and get super productive, click the buy now button. The program starts on the 1st of December. You get access within 24 hours.”

 


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